Underpants Over My Trousers

6 Comments

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  1. Noel Jackson

    Comic books have always been a huge inspiration to me, from X-men growing up, to the latest amazing stuff out there, like Danger Girl, etc. But, I never sought out the deep connection you’ve made between website and comics. Thank you for jogging my noggin’ to never put the comics down!

  2. Keri Henare

    I really enjoyed this article Andy. As web designers, we have come from a time of constraint and breaking out of those boundaries is something that we have to actively pursue. To excuse a cliche, this is the sort of ‘out of the box’ thinking that we need to see more articles about.

    I’m the middle of a redesign myself, I found this really beneficial.

    You know you’re a geek when your favourite part of Christmas is 24ways.

  3. _Marvel_ous! Being belgian, the 9th art have been part of my education since my very infancy, I love it and cannot live without it, there’s so much to learn through the words of all these (anti-)heroes. For the first time I see another dimension of graphic novels and understand why they’re also called the sequential art. Thank you very much Andy.

    I’m always impressed how inspiring, thought-provoking, creative your articles are. If art and science can come along each other, then it’s through the passion with which you tell the result of your meticulous research.

  4. Ben Walker

    Wicked. I remember you mentioned comics and techniques of narrative timing at the Leicester WFWP, and it has been in the back of my mind ever since. I read the McCloud book back in the late 90s, and I can highly recommend it. It’s one of those books I’ve been flipping through in bookshops ever since I read it.

    Your examples are great, and just when I thought we had seen it all with the more space = more time theory, you whip out the borderless is the new bordered hypothesis, and leave us wanting more. Much like how the conundrum adds an element of much-needed drama to the end of an episode of Countdown. Fab.

    I think Comics and Web Design Expo 2008 might be the highlight of the geek calendar.

  5. Ravi Vora

    I am really happy that you used The Watchmen as an example. To me, the sheer thought behind the artwork is incredible. What happens between the panels is almost more important than what happens in them.

    Giving users a sense of drama, suspense, or any emotion on the web is difficult. When it happens though, you really feel it. These are some great principles that are definitely showcased in a unique way.

  6. Bronwyn Jones

    Something important to note about anything written by Alan Moore — and Watchmen in particular: Moore’s exhaustive scripts typically laid out pages and panels for his artists before they ever put ink to board.

    (For reference see: http://home.insightbb.com/~fourcolorheros/free/WatchmenScript.pdf)

    In fact, this is true of many (though not all) comics. In the initial script, the writer decides how many panels will appear on a page and where they should be oriented.

    Just sayin’.

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